Posts tagged "email management"

EMC Extends MS Exchange, Adds Email Disaster Recovery

EMC and Microsoft can’t seem to get enough of each other. This time, EMC (site) is using a new API that came with Exchange 2010, extending the Exchange platform and offering back-up and disaster recovery for it.

Announced recently as a continuation of its “deep engineering” work with Microsoft, EMC is using Exchange’s Replication API not only to provide disaster and recovery solutions but also to add synchronous replication to Exchange.

By adding EMC’s Replication Enabler to the Exchange environment, EMC is giving companies an added layer of back-up, and by automating it ensures that in the event of a systems failure email will still be available across the enterprise.

Exchange's Replication API

This is the first time that a company outside of the direct Microsoft family has made use of the Replication API that came with the recently released Exchange Server 2010. In doing so, EMC has been able to considerably extend the reach of its data and recovery tools.

There are three new tools:

  • Replication Enabler for MS Exchange Server 2010: Enables integration of synchronous replication into the Exchange environment and supports EMC RecoverPoint Continuous Replication and MirrorView Remote Synch replication.
  • EMC Autostart: Provides infrastructure monitoring and automated restart for MES 2010 and is particularly useful and aimed at enterprises with geographically distant data centers.
  • Replication Manager: Provides point-in-time replicas of information lost in databases located on EMC arrays.

Consulting Services

EMC is also offering consulting services to enterprises that are looking to deploy or upgrade to Exchange Server, which was introduced last November, as well as for those that are looking to deploy Microsoft’s holistic communications strategy, Microsoft Unified Communications (MUC).

Exchange Server 2010 is corner-stone of that strategy, which aims to manage all asynchronous communications and delivers unified messaging (e-mail, voice mail, faxes, and calendaring) to users directly.

While EMC is not the only company to offer services for Exchange 2010 — Dell (site) started offering migration services in November — by providing comprehensive back-up disaster recovery, they are likely to be amongst the most popular.

Document Management Roll-up: Can't Let Go of the Paper, Has SharePoint Met Its Match?

This week there’s been a couple of wild claims doing the circuit, not least of which is the demise of SharePoint at the hands of Salesforce.com’s Chatter, while Microsoft gets social with Outlook.

Outlook Gets Social

The promised link between Microsoft Outlook and social networking has finally happened with Microsoft reporting this week that software updates between LinkedIn (site) and Outlook have just been released in beta.

Designed for Office 2010, the new set of applications that will also include email links for Facebook (site) and MySpace (site) will go on general release later this year.

The LinkedIn connection to Outlook lets people using the email program stay in tune with any changes in job status, contact information or affiliations being shared by friends at the career-focused online community.

The company says that the new connections are all about bringing, friends, family and colleagues into your inbox and enables you to communicate with them and see their social activities at the same time.

If you’ve been following us here you will be aware of the problems that managing unstructured content in emails is causing enterprises.

Likely that the same companies can hardly wait to thank Microsoft for this new Outlook ability. The test version of Outlook is available online at the Office website.

SharePoint To Be Killed By Chatter?

That Salesforce.com (site) has launched the private beta of Chatter, an enterprise collaboration tool for the cloud will stir some interest; that some of those involved in the private beta say Chatter heralds the end of SharePoint should cause more than a stir.

The end of legacy collaboration software like Microsoft SharePoint and IBM Lotus Notes is here," said Marc Benioff, chairman and CEO, salesforce.com. "Consumer Internet services like Facebook and Twitter have shown us better ways to collaborate …".

Muscle-flexing aside, Chatter does come with a number of document collaboration tools, amongst other features, that should be useful for those with document management issues.

In this respect the document sharing and security settings are of interest. With Chatter, users can instantly and securely search the Chatter feed to access, share and even download the documents and other information files via an Internet browser.

It also enables users to manage who has access to what information based on Force.com platform security settings, which decides what information can be seen by who.

If you’re interested in more, you can find out more from the website, but nothing there would seem to back up Benioff’s claim that SharePoint is on its way out!

We Can’t Leave Paper Alone

According to AIIM (site) office staff just won’t give up on paper copies, despite the wide availability of scanners and document management systems.

A recent survey by the content management organization found that 62% of important paper documents are still archived as paper. Even when documents are sent off for archive scanning, 25% are photocopied beforehand “just in case” and less than a third of the paper originals are systematically destroyed after scanning.

Despite the fact that the legal admissibility of scanned paper documents has been established for nearly 20 years and is nailed down in legislation and standards around the world, there is still this suspicion among users that they may need to produce the original paper copy at some stage, the study says.

In the survey, 70% of the respondents agreed with the statement, “Users feel that paper records are needed for legal reasons.” Even at the organizational level, in 25% of businesses the legal admissibility of scanned documents is still seen as an issue.

According to AIIM president John Mancini, we still haven’t tapped into the real potential savings of using document management software, because we just can’t let the paper go.

If you are interested in finding out more, you can download the research from the AIIM website.

How Is Your Records Management?

Something else from AIIM this week that might help companies see how effective their records management software: take AIIM’s quick, easy online assessment to find out what stage of records management competency your organization is in, and then learn more about that stage, its risks and the benefits of progressing to the next.

Participants will be asked 13 questions in order to determine their organization's Records Management competency. Once the assessment is completed, participants can download the Solution Brief for their identified stage which includes information on:

  • Current state of records management
  • The risks of your current state
  • The benefits of progressing to the next stage.

And it’s all free.

Iron Mountain Adds Archiving

We couldn’t let this week go by with some mention of the acquisition of Mimosa Systems by Iron Mountain for an estimated US$ 112 million in cash.

Iron Mountain is a major player in the information management market with this deal providing it with an on-premise content archiving solution — in this case Mimosa NearPoint — to complement their cloud based offering.

Mimosa NearPoint is an email archiving and eDiscovery solution. Version 4 was brought to market last June, offering an integrated content archive that includes not only email, but also content in blogs, wikis, documents and more. It also improved content search, case management and came with a new user interface and data capture methodology.

It's these capabilities along with being able to now capture and manage content from additional devices like desktops, laptops and systems like SharePoint that caused Iron Mountain to choose Mimosa.

EMC Extends Exchange 2010, Adding Archiving, Retention and eDiscovery

While EMC’s (site) SourceOne suite of modular integrated software enables email management, archiving, records management, search and eDiscovery, the company says it is expanding it to enable users make a speedier and more efficient move to Microsoft Exchange 2010.

Although EMC is consistently working to improve on its information infrastructure technology, SourceOne's extension of Exchange 2010 could be a game-changer in the eDiscovery market segment. Even Gartner in its recent MarketScope for E-Discovery Software Product Vendors report has given it a thumbs up.

The result is that EMC continues lead the charge on eDiscovery technology — something it had signaled last September with the acquisition of Kazeon (site). With email management and archiving a core element of current information management, the SourceOne suite should play a central role in developing that market for them.

Easing the Upgrade to Exchange 2010

Let’s take a quick look. The first thing to say in this respect is that EMC's SourceOne is Exchange 2010-ready out of the box and extends the archiving, retention and eDiscovery features of Exchange’s email management abilities.

SourceOne has the ability to take large quantities of PSR files and emails that have been inactive for long periods of time out of both Exchange 2003 and 2007 and place them in SoureOne’s business archive before users make the move to Exchange 2010.

These files are easily accessible and can be stored with specific retention and destruction schedules. The beauty of this is that they do not need to be moved across to Exchange 2010 which greatly eases the problems of migration.

In effect, what it does is improve the performance of Exchange 2010 by applying single-instance storage for messages in the archive, by automating the migration of messages to the appropriate location and by reducing backup and recovery times.

EMC, Kazeon And SourceOne

The other element that EMC has just introduced is EMC SourceOne eDiscovery — Kazeon based on the Kazeon’s eDiscovery Fourth Generation software, which was released last May (just before EMC bought the vendor in September).

Again, focusing on email management, Kazeon provides three principal products, integrated within a single, underlying software platform, aiming to ensure a smooth workflow. They include:

  • Analysis & Review: Capabilities include patented analytics, concept extraction and search.
  • Collection & Culling: The identification of ESI based on case requirements.
  • Legal Hold Management: Fully indexed or index-less targeted collection, and a forensically sound and defensible collection from any source.

Searching through emails, SourceOne Kazeon automates the identification, collection and preservation of electronically stored information (ESI) that resides "in the wild", tags it for legal hold and places it in a protected repository under user-defined retention and destruction policies.

Already on the market, EMC says the purpose of developing the SourceOne Exchange 2010 capabilities in the first place was to enable organizations to develop complete, actionable information governance strategies with email management as one of the core elements.

If you’re concerned with rampant emails getting out of control, it might well be worth checking out.