Posts tagged "blogs"

The Newspaper Club Lets You Design and Print Your Own Newspaper


Did you work on your high school newspaper or yearbook? If so, there’s a new club in town. No tryouts necessary. All you have to do is sign up and those days of dreaming about being your own publisher are over. Thanks to the Newspaper Club, a new London-based startup, anyone can print their own 12-page newspaper.

A Legend in Its Own Time

As print becomes a relic of the past, a new fascination with print-based media is surfacing. The Newspaper Club takes you back to the days of yore and lets you self-publish on newsprint.

The Newspaper Club charges different amounts depending on the size of the print runs. It is about £330 (or £1.10 a copy) for 300 black-and-white issues of a newspaper, for example. For color, it will cost you more.

Using a tool called ARTHR, wannabe publishers can design their own newspaper to a decent standard. As well, wannabe desktop publishers can employ graphic design skills and upload their own versions via PDF.

Right now, the Newspaper Club is more of a novelty, being used to create cute wedding favors and tokens for family members. However, there are hopes that bloggers could use it offer print versions of their blogs or as a personal manifest of one’s views on politics or the cinema.

Presently, the Newspaper Club is exclusive to the UK as high shipping costs make shipping internationally not an option. However, the club is at SXSW this year trying to pitch an American version.

This Newsprint Smells Like Irony

As neat as the Newspaper Club is at offering users the opportunity of having their words in print, one can’t help but see the irony. As thousands of “real” newspapers face their demise and watch their subscriptions tank, some users are willingly paying more than their daily paper’s worth to produce their own.

On the other hand, perhaps newspapers will join the Newspaper Club and start using this model to produce and publish their own newspapers. It couldn’t hurt.

Have a Blog You Want to Migrate to SharePoint?

Metalogix (site) is at it again, offering another way to migrate your content into another CMS. This time it's for those of you who have a blog but are being lulled by the sweet song of SharePoint 2010.

Have Blog? Will Migrate

So here's the deal, Microsoft is marketing SharePoint 2010 as a business collaboration platform. And that means it supports collaboration and content management (enterprise content management and web content management).

So it's the perfect platform for you bloggers who want more functionality than your current blogging software offers. At least that's what Metalogix believes. Which is why they have developed a migration tool — the Metalogix Migration Manager for Blogs — that will help you migrate your blog into SharePoint 2010.

What Blogging Software is Supported?

Here's the list:

  • Google Blogger
  • Wordpress
  • Movable Type
  • Telligent
  • Any blog system that supports either the Metaweblog standard or RSS

What Content is Migrated?

What components of your blog can you migrate? You can migrate all your posts, comments and categories.

Like other Metalogix Migration Managers, batch migration and remote administration of the migration are also supported.

Metalogix Migration Manager for Blogs

The migration manager also supports the migration of blogs from SharePoint 2007 to SharePoint 2010. In this case all version history and user permissions are supported as well.

Time to Migrate Along?

So if you are tired of your current blogging software or just want more functionality — like that found in SharePoint 2010, take a closer look.

And if you are a Microsoft MVP, you can get a free version of the Migration Manager for Blogs.

Oh, and if you aren't ready to go to SharePoint 2010, the migration manager will migrate your blogs to SharePoint 2007.

SMB Tech Roll-up: Social Media Is Good And Bad For Business, With Security Top of Mind

We have a mixed bag of news for SMBs with conflicting views on whether social media is good or bad for business. There was a lot of other research published this week giving a considerable amount to think about for companies in, or thinking about entering the tech fray.

Social Media is good for Business?

American SMBs are turning to social media in an effort to boost their customer base, according to the recently released, Small Business Success Index.

Sponsored by Network Solutions and the Center for Excellence in Service at the University of Maryland's Smith School of Business, the report shows that over the past year alone social media adoption by small businesses has doubled from 12% to 24%.

The research showed that nearly one out of five small business owners is actively using social media in their business with many of them investing in social media applications, including blogs, Facebook and LinkedIn profiles.

The biggest expectation small business owners have from social media is expanding external marketing and engagement with 61% of the respondents indicating that they use social media to identify and attract new customers.

Amongst the findings:

  • 75% surveyed have a company page on a social networking site
  • 61% use social media for identifying and attracting new customers
  • 57% have built a network through a site like LinkedIn
  • 45% expect social media to be profitable in the next twelve months
  • 72% have found ways to operate more efficiently

However, it also showed that there were still some concerns about using social media with:

  • 50% saying it takes more time than expected
  • 17% saying it gives people a chance to criticize their business in a public forum

Only 6% felt that social media use has hurt the image of the business more than helped it.

Download a copy of the Small Business Success Index and also find out how your business scores on the six key dimensions of small business success from the website.

Social Media Is Bad For Business?

The flip side of the Small Business Success Index is the report from Webroot, which was also published this week showing that IT managers in small and medium-sized organizations believe malware spread through social networks, Web 2.0 applications and other Web-based vectors will pose the most serious risk to information security in 2010.

The data is part of a new survey of 803 IT professionals in companies with 100 to 5,000 employees in the United States, the UK and Australia.

The vast majority of respondents (80%) say Web 2.0-based malware will be a problem in 2010. In fact, seven out of 10 (73%) said Web-based threats are more difficult to manage than email-based threats. Survey respondents also identified data security and confidentiality, data loss prevention and securing mobile and laptop users as the top three priorities for Web security in 2010.

Webroot commissioned the survey to identify the threats security professionals most anticipate in 2010, the weakest links in Web security and how companies are addressing these issues.

Key findings include the fact that nearly one quarter of those surveyed believe their company is very or extremely vulnerable to threats from:

  • Microsoft operating system vulnerabilities (25%)
  • Unpatched client-side software (24%)
  • Browser vulnerabilities (24%)
  • Web 2.0 applications (23%)

The majority (73%) of respondents agree that managing Web-based threats is more challenging than managing email-based threats.

And while many believe they are under threat, many others have already been compromised. These included:

  • 23% compromised by employees who accessed personal Webmail accounts
  • 24% used social networking sites
  • 25% used P2P networking
  • 32% downloaded media

If you’re interested in more check it out on the Webroot blog.

SMBs Maintaining Not Upgrading Software

SMBs are spending more than half their budgets on maintaining existing software than they are on new or upgraded software, according to the latest Forrester's Enterprise And SMB Software Survey.

The survey of nearly 2,200 IT executives and technology decision-makers at enterprise and small and medium-size businesses (SMBs) in North America and Europe is part of Forrester's Business Data Services (BDS) series, which helps Vendor Strategy professionals profile their target market's budget allocation and technology adoption.

The survey shows that the poor economic environment has created a backlog of business application software upgrade activities for firms, and many plan to address the issue this year.

Amongst the areas companies will be spending on are:

  • 21 percent of SMBs plan to upgrade existing finance and accounting software,
  • 19 percent of SMBs plan to upgrade their customer relationship management (CRM) applications,
  • 18 percent of SMBs plan to upgrade industry-specific software.

In addition, more than 20 percent of all SMBs have concrete plans to implement CRM or information and knowledge management (I&KM) software in 2010 or later, representing the fastest-growing SMB software markets in 2010.

While cloud computing has many enterprises interested, growth of software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications is driving the market more, and infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) is still slow, the report also shows.

More information about Forrester's Business Data Services is available at the Forrester website.

UK SMBs Save By Not Using WiFi

Instead of relying on Wi-Fi hotspots, small enterprises’ employees should use mobile broadband USB sticks and datacards when traveling to save their businesses an average of UK£ 2145 (US$ 3368) each year depending on the number of employees on the road, according to research by UK telecoms, technology and media consultancy Analysys Mason.

Entitled Small Enterprises Save Money With Mobile broadband, published ahead of Mobile World Congress 2010 just finishing in Barcelona, it shows that each employee who travels throughout the year can accumulate Wi-Fi hotspot charges of up to UK£ 700 (US$ 1099).

All in all, the quality of service, simplicity and performance of mobile broadband in the UK is very good. SMEs can choose highly competitive offerings, with or without contracts from different providers.

This short report is part of Analysys Mason’s Research Enterprise program on the global enterprise and SME sectors.

If you’re interested in more, details of the report can be found on the website.